Students reading Marc Morris on Eleanor of Castile

Thanks to Henry Walton of Manor CE Academy for sharing this reading task. Students are supported to read historian Marc Morris’ account of Eleanor of Castile, wife of Edward I. There is a glossary and a worksheet to accompany the reading.

Eleanor of Castile

Eleanor of Castile – worksheet

Eleanor of Castile Glossary

GCSE Public Health using York Archives

Huge thanks to Heather Sherman, York College, for generously sharing this work using York’s city archives. Heather has put together this booklet of sources about public health in York for GCSE students.

The booklet is a teacher pack (this document: GCSE Public Health York Archives Material_Teacher Pack ) that links the research to the OCR, AQA and Edexcel GCSE History specifications. There are suggested activities/ questions to use with students to develop their thinking and link national history to a local context.

Heather has also provided a blank copy of each of the sources (separate sources) for use to design your own activities/ resource pack for students. She suggests that colleagues use any of the glossaries/ questions/ activities that she has designed when creating their own resources, or create their own, or use a mix of both. The suggested activities/ questions are not intended to be an exhaustive list and can be adapted to suit different students.

As a very experienced A level teacher, Heather also has her eye to what students may need to be able to do if they decide to carry on their history studies.

Meanwhile she … Aletta Jacobs

Aletta Jacobs was one of the first women in the Netherlands to become a doctor and opened one of the first birth control clinics for poor and working-class women in 1882. Thanks to Caitlin Sutherland, who completed her UoY PGCE in June and is about to start teaching in Uxbridge, for putting this ‘meanwhile she’ together. It will be useful for colleagues to add diversity to the part of the medicine / health through time course where Robert Koch is busy identifying bacteria. Meanwhile she Aletta Jacobs

Investigating the culture of a period

Inspired by a session at the Historical Association conference, staff at York College have encouraged their students to engage with the cultural milieu of the periods they study at A Level. This is to help them gain the sense of period and place they need in order to make sense of their new specific topic knowledge. The results of two of them are here. There is a document on culture in Germany in the 20th century and one on 15th and 16th century English and European culture. Nice for other A level students, useful also for students doing GCSE units on all or part of these topics, and definitely nerd-y knowledge – thanks for sharing!

20th century German culture

15th and 16thC English culture

‘Women in War’ HA session 2019 resources

Here are the resources that were explained in the HA 2019 conference in Chester about ‘Women in War’.

The timeline thematic activity:

Women in war over time thematic

British women in war timeline

 

Activity using the memorial to the women of the British Empire who did in WW1

 

Activity about the role of women in WW1 from a transnational perspective 

  • Take an inference diagram* and work with it.
  • Now pass them around and look at each others’ work (this could, of course be on the wall)
  • What can we infer from the source collection as a whole?
  • Which of these roles do you think would have continuity with 19thC women’s roles and which were driven by the necessities of war?
  • What would you now like to know about WW1 Y9? (why not let an activity such as this drive a student led framing of the WW1 enquiry question they wish to pursue?)

2019 women WW1 sources as inference diagrams – *they are all here.

 

And go to the ‘slot-ins’ page of this site for Women in War ‘slot-ins’!

 

 

 

Teaching a history of mental health to improve thematic understanding in a packed curriculum

Following on from our work that featured in TH 173 about teaching a history of people with disabilities, we have focused our recent development work on resources for teaching about mental health in the past. Here are the resources that we presented in our session at the HA conference in Chester in May 2019. This work is ongoing and we are also working with colleagues in the Netherlands. It would be great if other people would like to get involved.

Resources are provided here for a single lesson with the EQ: How differently have people viewed mental health?

We have a moral duty to reflect the diverse past in our classrooms and the Equality Duty Act of 2010 requires us to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimization, advance equality of opportunity between different groups and foster good relations between different groups. Respecting the past of everyone is part of fostering this.

From this lesson we want students to learn that:
• Mental health has a past and therefore a history
• Ideas of what constitutes mental illness and health have changed over time
• Ideas of what causes and the treatments for mental illness have changed over time due to these changing ideas, but also other cultural and societal changes.

It could be taught at the start of GCSE or as a KS3 study to encourage conceptual understanding of change over time (thematic).

The resources you need are here:

There are also a selection of slot-ins on the YorkClio slot-in page.

The starter images are here:

Diversity resources for busy teachers

Whose Histories?: Helping busy History teachers keep their curriculum diverse

This short guide was created and has been recently updated by the University of York’s PGCE history trainees in a morning session where they thought about diversity and explored what resources are available. It contains some general principles and ideas for making lessons more diverse, with links to resources. It is not intended to be exhaustive, but to be a contribution to help busy teachers. Please do make suggestions to improve it.

whose-histories-diversity-in-history-lessons-2020

Bumping into sources!

Here is a PPT and some thoughts about using sources as evidence at KS3 and KS4 to do well at GCSE and NOT use endless exam questions because: 1) there is more to education, 2) it’s not the way to build secure knowledge for strong results.

Bumping into sources

Accompanying notes

The story of the Pilgrimage of Grace   PoG notes sheet   PoG fact sheet

A taxonomy of substantive knowledge    Brixton burning the riots remembered