Investigating the culture of a period

Inspired by a session at the Historical Association conference, staff at York College have encouraged their students to engage with the cultural milieu of the periods they study at A Level. This is to help them gain the sense of period and place they need in order to make sense of their new specific topic knowledge. The results of two of them are here. There is a document on culture in Germany in the 20th century and one on 15th and 16th century English and European culture. Nice for other A level students, useful also for students doing GCSE units on all or part of these topics, and definitely nerd-y knowledge – thanks for sharing!

20th century German culture

15th and 16thC English culture

‘Women in War’ HA session 2019 resources

Here are the resources that were explained in the HA 2019 conference in Chester about ‘Women in War’.

The timeline thematic activity:

Women in war over time thematic

British women in war timeline

 

Activity using the memorial to the women of the British Empire who did in WW1

 

Activity about the role of women in WW1 from a transnational perspective 

  • Take an inference diagram* and work with it.
  • Now pass them around and look at each others’ work (this could, of course be on the wall)
  • What can we infer from the source collection as a whole?
  • Which of these roles do you think would have continuity with 19thC women’s roles and which were driven by the necessities of war?
  • What would you now like to know about WW1 Y9? (why not let an activity such as this drive a student led framing of the WW1 enquiry question they wish to pursue?)

2019 women WW1 sources as inference diagrams – *they are all here.

 

And go to the ‘slot-ins’ page of this site for Women in War ‘slot-ins’!

 

 

 

York resources: Roman Africans and a York apprentice at the time of the Black Death

In the Yorkshire Museum are the remains of Julia Tertia. A mixed race Roman woman who died in York and whose skeleton and grave have been excavated by archaeologists. You can find a resource for primary children here and some of it could be used with Y7.

Julia Tertia is sometimes known as the ‘Bangle Lady’ due to bracelets found in her grave. There is a teacher script, PPT and cards that can be adapted for KS3 teaching in order to explore ancient migration and diversity.

On the same site is a KS3 resource for teaching about a teenager living in the York in the years prior to the Black Death. Students can learn about medieval history, osteology and biology and the human life-course. Again, scripts, PPT and resources are all provided here. You can find a 5 min YouTube film about the teenager William Westoby, telling his experience of moving from a village as the second son of a farmer to the city of York. The activity plan then goes on to the consequences of the the Black Death for people like William. Thus, it sets the Black Death in the context of a wider study of medieval life and links village and town life, approaching the topic through a teenager’s life.

Thank you to Prof. Hella Eckardt, Professor of Roman Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading for sharing these with us.

 

History of Women in 6 objects

Does your teaching reflect that over 50% of the people in the past were not male? Here is free resource a history of women through 6 objects to help you.

Inspired by the book ‘A History of Women in 100 Objects’ by Maggie Andrews and Janis Lomas, this classroom wall display has been put together by Ruth Lingard. It takes six objects, explains their past and what they reveal about the women to whom they are connected.

The ‘slot-in’ section is also growing. Check out a new addition on Mary Anning.