Talking enquiries and sharing resources

At our recent YorkClio network meeting we spent our time talking about enquiries. Colleagues brought enquiries they wanted to improve and enquiries they felt were working. It was both useful and invigorating to put the YorkClio hive mind to work. We couldn’t record the discussions, but we are sharing a couple of the resources here.

The Crusades was a key topic. What do we want students to learn at Key Stage 3 in a few lessons about the Crusades? How does this learning ‘fit’ into the overall history curriculum? There was a consensus that the consequences of the Crusades are important to teach. Here is a resource from Ben Longworth that can be used as a basis to make cards on this: Crusade Consequences. Colleagues with lots of experience of teaching this topic stressed to us all the importance of doing much work with students to ensure security with the geography, the chronology and the key players.

Another key concern is how to bridge the gaps to build coherent narrative. This is the topic of an article by Natalie Kesterton in September 2019’s Teaching History. She shared with us how she uses bridging narratives in lessons between topics and one is given here: What should we remember 1348-1509 DIFF

Investigating the culture of a period

Inspired by a session at the Historical Association conference, staff at York College have encouraged their students to engage with the cultural milieu of the periods they study at A Level. This is to help them gain the sense of period and place they need in order to make sense of their new specific topic knowledge. The results of two of them are here. There is a document on culture in Germany in the 20th century and one on 15th and 16th century English and European culture. Nice for other A level students, useful also for students doing GCSE units on all or part of these topics, and definitely nerd-y knowledge – thanks for sharing!

20th century German culture

15th and 16thC English culture

‘Women in War’ HA session 2019 resources

Here are the resources that were explained in the HA 2019 conference in Chester about ‘Women in War’.

The timeline thematic activity:

Women in war over time thematic

British women in war timeline

 

Activity using the memorial to the women of the British Empire who did in WW1

 

Activity about the role of women in WW1 from a transnational perspective 

  • Take an inference diagram* and work with it.
  • Now pass them around and look at each others’ work (this could, of course be on the wall)
  • What can we infer from the source collection as a whole?
  • Which of these roles do you think would have continuity with 19thC women’s roles and which were driven by the necessities of war?
  • What would you now like to know about WW1 Y9? (why not let an activity such as this drive a student led framing of the WW1 enquiry question they wish to pursue?)

2019 women WW1 sources as inference diagrams – *they are all here.

 

And go to the ‘slot-ins’ page of this site for Women in War ‘slot-ins’!

 

 

 

York resources: Roman Africans and a York apprentice at the time of the Black Death

In the Yorkshire Museum are the remains of Julia Tertia. A mixed race Roman woman who died in York and whose skeleton and grave have been excavated by archaeologists. You can find a resource for primary children here and some of it could be used with Y7.

Julia Tertia is sometimes known as the ‘Bangle Lady’ due to bracelets found in her grave. There is a teacher script, PPT and cards that can be adapted for KS3 teaching in order to explore ancient migration and diversity.

On the same site is a KS3 resource for teaching about a teenager living in the York in the years prior to the Black Death. Students can learn about medieval history, osteology and biology and the human life-course. Again, scripts, PPT and resources are all provided here. You can find a 5 min YouTube film about the teenager William Westoby, telling his experience of moving from a village as the second son of a farmer to the city of York. The activity plan then goes on to the consequences of the the Black Death for people like William. Thus, it sets the Black Death in the context of a wider study of medieval life and links village and town life, approaching the topic through a teenager’s life.

Thank you to Prof. Hella Eckardt, Professor of Roman Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading for sharing these with us.

 

Quality resources about schools and WW1

A couple of really interesting resources that have come to our attention.

Firstly, a sourcebook about World War One that concentrates on the global dimension. Great for sources to show diversity and that it was, well, a WORLD War, with global impact.

Secondly, an interesting website of resources about secondary schooling since 1945. A great opportunity to build some oral history around this!

 

meanwhile, elsewhere…

If you haven’t yet found it, here’s a wonderful resource crowd-sourced from history teachers across the country. Richard Kennett (@kenradical) had the great idea to use KS3 homework time to get kids to find out what was going on somewhere else at the same time as the events they were studying in class. A brilliantly simple way to get breadth into a jam-packed curriculum. Will Bailey-Watson (@mrwbw) then suggested a crowd-source of these and has acted as co-ordinator and editor. The results are being posted on the website ‘meanwhile, elsewhere..’ and are free for everyone to use.

 

Resources for Schools from Oxford University

“How do we create a curriculum in schools and universities that best reflects the histories of our current students and future citizens? As Britain has become a more diverse society, and as a result become increasingly aware of its diverse past, the need to ensure that is reflected in what we teach and research is a question of growing importance, educationally and politically.”

That’s the start of the blogpost that explains the thinking behind the new resources for schools trial from Oxford University. You can read the blogpost HERE

The result of this thinking so far is the development of knowledge rich resources that are not focused on the British Isles, or even Europe. This site is worth exploring to expand your own subject knowledge, for resources you can use and adapt for use in class, for ideas about more diverse approaches to school history topics.

The resources team would welcome comments via the website.

Why is Europe so many different countries?

Reading Tim Marshall’s Prisoners of Geography over the Easter holidays developed my thinking and questioning as to why certain countries perpetually seemed to be at war. I always knew that France and Germany had historic disagreements, but never stopped to consider how the physical geography of the countries, combined with individuals’ desire for power, could influence this.
With this in mind, I created this two-lesson sequence, aiming to draw together elements of historical and geographical teaching in a way to help develop students’ schema of the medieval period, as well as to understand why countries perpetually seem to be at war. It is designed for Year 7, which is why I have combined some regions (notably France) into more of a nation state than it was.
As a non-geography expert, I am sure that there are many elements of the discipline that I could have included but did not. If you happen to think of any ways to improve this resource, please let me know.
The resources are here:
Victoria Bettney
University of York/Pathfinder TSA trainee 2017-18 and York High from September 2018