‘Women in War’ HA session 2019 resources

Here are the resources that were explained in the HA 2019 conference in Chester about ‘Women in War’.

The timeline thematic activity:

Women in war over time thematic

British women in war timeline

 

Activity using the memorial to the women of the British Empire who did in WW1

 

Activity about the role of women in WW1 from a transnational perspective 

  • Take an inference diagram* and work with it.
  • Now pass them around and look at each others’ work (this could, of course be on the wall)
  • What can we infer from the source collection as a whole?
  • Which of these roles do you think would have continuity with 19thC women’s roles and which were driven by the necessities of war?
  • What would you now like to know about WW1 Y9? (why not let an activity such as this drive a student led framing of the WW1 enquiry question they wish to pursue?)

2019 women WW1 sources as inference diagrams – *they are all here.

 

And go to the ‘slot-ins’ page of this site for Women in War ‘slot-ins’!

 

 

 

History of Women in 6 objects

Does your teaching reflect that over 50% of the people in the past were not male? Here is free resource a history of women through 6 objects to help you.

Inspired by the book ‘A History of Women in 100 Objects’ by Maggie Andrews and Janis Lomas, this classroom wall display has been put together by Ruth Lingard. It takes six objects, explains their past and what they reveal about the women to whom they are connected.

The ‘slot-in’ section is also growing. Check out a new addition on Mary Anning.

Quality resources about schools and WW1

A couple of really interesting resources that have come to our attention.

Firstly, a sourcebook about World War One that concentrates on the global dimension. Great for sources to show diversity and that it was, well, a WORLD War, with global impact.

Secondly, an interesting website of resources about secondary schooling since 1945. A great opportunity to build some oral history around this!

 

Borthwick Institute School Resource Packs

These are nice! The University oof York’s Borthwick Institute has produced these schools packs using material in their extensive archives. There are materials that can be passed on to English and Art colleagues too.

Of most interest to History teachers will be the pack on the Transatlantic Slave Trade, its links to Harewood House and the abolition debate. Local York teachers will find the Heslington Hall materials useful to flavour KS3 topics with local history.

@YorkClio and @Snelsonh had a fascinating day with the Bootham and Retreat Hospital archives – the results of that will be out soon – and you can find the Retreat archives online here too.

meanwhile, elsewhere…

If you haven’t yet found it, here’s a wonderful resource crowd-sourced from history teachers across the country. Richard Kennett (@kenradical) had the great idea to use KS3 homework time to get kids to find out what was going on somewhere else at the same time as the events they were studying in class. A brilliantly simple way to get breadth into a jam-packed curriculum. Will Bailey-Watson (@mrwbw) then suggested a crowd-source of these and has acted as co-ordinator and editor. The results are being posted on the website ‘meanwhile, elsewhere..’ and are free for everyone to use.

 

Resources for Schools from Oxford University

“How do we create a curriculum in schools and universities that best reflects the histories of our current students and future citizens? As Britain has become a more diverse society, and as a result become increasingly aware of its diverse past, the need to ensure that is reflected in what we teach and research is a question of growing importance, educationally and politically.”

That’s the start of the blogpost that explains the thinking behind the new resources for schools trial from Oxford University. You can read the blogpost HERE

The result of this thinking so far is the development of knowledge rich resources that are not focused on the British Isles, or even Europe. This site is worth exploring to expand your own subject knowledge, for resources you can use and adapt for use in class, for ideas about more diverse approaches to school history topics.

The resources team would welcome comments via the website.