Investigating the culture of a period

Inspired by a session at the Historical Association conference, staff at York College have encouraged their students to engage with the cultural milieu of the periods they study at A Level. This is to help them gain the sense of period and place they need in order to make sense of their new specific topic knowledge. The results of two of them are here. There is a document on culture in Germany in the 20th century and one on 15th and 16th century English and European culture. Nice for other A level students, useful also for students doing GCSE units on all or part of these topics, and definitely nerd-y knowledge – thanks for sharing!

20th century German culture

15th and 16thC English culture

Teaching a history of mental health to improve thematic understanding in a packed curriculum

Following on from our work that featured in TH 173 about teaching a history of people with disabilities, we have focused our recent development work on resources for teaching about mental health in the past. Here are the resources that we presented in our session at the HA conference in Chester in May 2019. This work is ongoing and we are also working with colleagues in the Netherlands. It would be great if other people would like to get involved.

Resources are provided here for a single lesson with the EQ: How differently have people viewed mental health?

We have a moral duty to reflect the diverse past in our classrooms and the Equality Duty Act of 2010 requires us to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimization, advance equality of opportunity between different groups and foster good relations between different groups. Respecting the past of everyone is part of fostering this.

From this lesson we want students to learn that:
• Mental health has a past and therefore a history
• Ideas of what constitutes mental illness and health have changed over time
• Ideas of what causes and the treatments for mental illness have changed over time due to these changing ideas, but also other cultural and societal changes.

It could be taught at the start of GCSE or as a KS3 study to encourage conceptual understanding of change over time (thematic).

The resources you need are here:

There are also a selection of slot-ins on the YorkClio slot-in page.

The starter images are here:

York resources: Roman Africans and a York apprentice at the time of the Black Death

In the Yorkshire Museum are the remains of Julia Tertia. A mixed race Roman woman who died in York and whose skeleton and grave have been excavated by archaeologists. You can find a resource for primary children here and some of it could be used with Y7.

Julia Tertia is sometimes known as the ‘Bangle Lady’ due to bracelets found in her grave. There is a teacher script, PPT and cards that can be adapted for KS3 teaching in order to explore ancient migration and diversity.

On the same site is a KS3 resource for teaching about a teenager living in the York in the years prior to the Black Death. Students can learn about medieval history, osteology and biology and the human life-course. Again, scripts, PPT and resources are all provided here. You can find a 5 min YouTube film about the teenager William Westoby, telling his experience of moving from a village as the second son of a farmer to the city of York. The activity plan then goes on to the consequences of the the Black Death for people like William. Thus, it sets the Black Death in the context of a wider study of medieval life and links village and town life, approaching the topic through a teenager’s life.

Thank you to Prof. Hella Eckardt, Professor of Roman Archaeology at the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading for sharing these with us.

 

Narratives to build chronological understanding and fill in the gaps

Natalie Kesterton, Head of History at Ryedale School and Chartered History Teacher, has developed several approaches to building chronological coherence in the KS3 curriculum by filling the gaps in the story – the bits we don’t have time to teach. She came to the University of York History PGCE mentors’ meeting and shared her ideas so far. This work is being written up for Teaching History and will be featuring in the SHP and HA conferences, so we were lucky to get a preview. Her work supports the development of students’ chronological understanding and helps them to join up the different depth studies by identifying the big themes.  Natalie has kindly shared her resources so far:

final 1660-1750 narrative DIFFERENTIATED X2 

final 1660-1750 narrative DIFFERENTIATED

final 1660-1750 narrative DRAFT THREE

Narrative 1216-1348 DRAFT THREE DIFF needs work

Narrative 1216-1348 DRAFT THREE

Which King 1087-1199 DRAFT THREE DIFFERENTIATED

Which King 1087-1199 DRAFT THREE DIFFERENTIATEDx2

Which King 1087-1199 DRAFT THREE

History of Women in 6 objects

Does your teaching reflect that over 50% of the people in the past were not male? Here is free resource a history of women through 6 objects to help you.

Inspired by the book ‘A History of Women in 100 Objects’ by Maggie Andrews and Janis Lomas, this classroom wall display has been put together by Ruth Lingard. It takes six objects, explains their past and what they reveal about the women to whom they are connected.

The ‘slot-in’ section is also growing. Check out a new addition on Mary Anning.

What sort of England did William Conquer?

Resources for this enquiry from the HA teachers’ course with the British Library re Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

The lesson plan is here: What sort of England did William conquer lesson plan

The PPT is here: Anglo-Saxons

The sources and chart are here: Sources    Chart for sources  

Teacher crib sheet for source chart

Sources back up Baxter sheet

The interpretations are here:

Baxter balance and faction intBL blogpost intHenry poetry intLacey consent and creativity intLacey life tough intLacey prop USA intMorris church intWood on what is lost intWood rights and property intWood women int

 

YHF Resources: Thomas Becket session

The teaching materials that were presented in November 2018 at Yorkshire History Forum are here for your use. York PGCE medieval religion lessons-FINAL

They are:

  1. An activity about religion in medieval life with plan, resources and subject knowledge for teachers.
  2. Two lessons about Becket, with resources and subject knowledge for teachers.
  3. A fully resourced lesson on the rivalry between York and Canterbury that was fueled by the Becket affair with an impact on the historic environment still evident today.
  4. A lesson on medieval pilgrimage with teacher plan, resources and subject knowledge update.

These materials were developed by the University of York PGCE historians 2017-18. To do this they worked with Jeremy Muldowney from York Minster and with Dr John Jenkins, University of York and other members of the Centre for Christianity and Culture. The materials were edited by Helen Snelson.

 

 

meanwhile, elsewhere…

If you haven’t yet found it, here’s a wonderful resource crowd-sourced from history teachers across the country. Richard Kennett (@kenradical) had the great idea to use KS3 homework time to get kids to find out what was going on somewhere else at the same time as the events they were studying in class. A brilliantly simple way to get breadth into a jam-packed curriculum. Will Bailey-Watson (@mrwbw) then suggested a crowd-source of these and has acted as co-ordinator and editor. The results are being posted on the website ‘meanwhile, elsewhere..’ and are free for everyone to use.

 

Resources for Schools from Oxford University

“How do we create a curriculum in schools and universities that best reflects the histories of our current students and future citizens? As Britain has become a more diverse society, and as a result become increasingly aware of its diverse past, the need to ensure that is reflected in what we teach and research is a question of growing importance, educationally and politically.”

That’s the start of the blogpost that explains the thinking behind the new resources for schools trial from Oxford University. You can read the blogpost HERE

The result of this thinking so far is the development of knowledge rich resources that are not focused on the British Isles, or even Europe. This site is worth exploring to expand your own subject knowledge, for resources you can use and adapt for use in class, for ideas about more diverse approaches to school history topics.

The resources team would welcome comments via the website.