Diversity resources for busy teachers

Whose Histories?: Helping busy History teachers keep their curriculum diverse

This short guide was created and has been recently updated by the University of York’s PGCE history trainees in a morning session where they thought about diversity and explored what resources are available. It contains some general principles and ideas for making lessons more diverse, with links to resources. It is not intended to be exhaustive, but to be a contribution to help busy teachers. Please do make suggestions to improve it.

whose-histories-diversity-in-history-lessons 2019

Why is Europe so many different countries?

Reading Tim Marshall’s Prisoners of Geography over the Easter holidays developed my thinking and questioning as to why certain countries perpetually seemed to be at war. I always knew that France and Germany had historic disagreements, but never stopped to consider how the physical geography of the countries, combined with individuals’ desire for power, could influence this.
With this in mind, I created this two-lesson sequence, aiming to draw together elements of historical and geographical teaching in a way to help develop students’ schema of the medieval period, as well as to understand why countries perpetually seem to be at war. It is designed for Year 7, which is why I have combined some regions (notably France) into more of a nation state than it was.
As a non-geography expert, I am sure that there are many elements of the discipline that I could have included but did not. If you happen to think of any ways to improve this resource, please let me know.
The resources are here:
Victoria Bettney
University of York/Pathfinder TSA trainee 2017-18 and York High from September 2018

Madeleine Blaess’ diary: York woman in Nazi occupied Paris

This is a developing project. Madeleine Blaess was born in France, but grew up in Acomb and went to the Bar Convent School (now All Saints). She was trapped in Paris during the Nazi occupation and wrote a diary recording everyday life under occupation. She managed not to be interned, by pretending to be French. Two of her friends were murdered in Auschwitz. After the war she was an academic in Medieval French Literature at the University of Sheffield. The diary was revealed among her papers, which she left to the university when she died in 2013.  This was left to the University of Sheffield at her death.

The University of Sheffield are working on these papers and the diary is shortly to be publisned open access at White Rose University Press (which itself is something YorkClio folk should know about!) There is also a 35 minute film on its way.

This promises to be a fantastic way for York History and French teachers to connect a local story to a much bigger story that is commonly taught. We hope to develop the connection with this project further.