‘Women in War’ HA session 2019 resources

Here are the resources that were explained in the HA 2019 conference in Chester about ‘Women in War’.

The timeline thematic activity:

Women in war over time thematic

British women in war timeline

 

Activity using the memorial to the women of the British Empire who did in WW1

 

Activity about the role of women in WW1 from a transnational perspective 

  • Take an inference diagram* and work with it.
  • Now pass them around and look at each others’ work (this could, of course be on the wall)
  • What can we infer from the source collection as a whole?
  • Which of these roles do you think would have continuity with 19thC women’s roles and which were driven by the necessities of war?
  • What would you now like to know about WW1 Y9? (why not let an activity such as this drive a student led framing of the WW1 enquiry question they wish to pursue?)

2019 women WW1 sources as inference diagrams – *they are all here.

 

And go to the ‘slot-ins’ page of this site for Women in War ‘slot-ins’!

 

 

 

Teaching a history of mental health to improve thematic understanding in a packed curriculum

Following on from our work that featured in TH 173 about teaching a history of people with disabilities, we have focused our recent development work on resources for teaching about mental health in the past. Here are the resources that we presented in our session at the HA conference in Chester in May 2019. This work is ongoing and we are also working with colleagues in the Netherlands. It would be great if other people would like to get involved.

Resources are provided here for a single lesson with the EQ: How differently have people viewed mental health?

We have a moral duty to reflect the diverse past in our classrooms and the Equality Duty Act of 2010 requires us to eliminate unlawful discrimination, harassment and victimization, advance equality of opportunity between different groups and foster good relations between different groups. Respecting the past of everyone is part of fostering this.

From this lesson we want students to learn that:
• Mental health has a past and therefore a history
• Ideas of what constitutes mental illness and health have changed over time
• Ideas of what causes and the treatments for mental illness have changed over time due to these changing ideas, but also other cultural and societal changes.

It could be taught at the start of GCSE or as a KS3 study to encourage conceptual understanding of change over time (thematic).

The resources you need are here:

There are also a selection of slot-ins on the YorkClio slot-in page.

The starter images are here:

History of Women in 6 objects

Does your teaching reflect that over 50% of the people in the past were not male? Here is free resource a history of women through 6 objects to help you.

Inspired by the book ‘A History of Women in 100 Objects’ by Maggie Andrews and Janis Lomas, this classroom wall display has been put together by Ruth Lingard. It takes six objects, explains their past and what they reveal about the women to whom they are connected.

The ‘slot-in’ section is also growing. Check out a new addition on Mary Anning.