What sort of England did William Conquer?

Resources for this enquiry from the HA teachers’ course with the British Library re Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

The lesson plan is here: What sort of England did William conquer lesson plan

The PPT is here: Anglo-Saxons

The sources and chart are here: Sources    Chart for sources  

Teacher crib sheet for source chart

Sources back up Baxter sheet

The interpretations are here:

Baxter balance and faction intBL blogpost intHenry poetry intLacey consent and creativity intLacey life tough intLacey prop USA intMorris church intWood on what is lost intWood rights and property intWood women int

 

YHF Resources: Thomas Becket session

The teaching materials that were presented in November 2018 at Yorkshire History Forum are here for your use. York PGCE medieval religion lessons-FINAL

They are:

  1. An activity about religion in medieval life with plan, resources and subject knowledge for teachers.
  2. Two lessons about Becket, with resources and subject knowledge for teachers.
  3. A fully resourced lesson on the rivalry between York and Canterbury that was fueled by the Becket affair with an impact on the historic environment still evident today.
  4. A lesson on medieval pilgrimage with teacher plan, resources and subject knowledge update.

These materials were developed by the University of York PGCE historians 2017-18. To do this they worked with Jeremy Muldowney from York Minster and with Dr John Jenkins, University of York and other members of the Centre for Christianity and Culture. The materials were edited by Helen Snelson.

 

 

Quality resources about schools and WW1

A couple of really interesting resources that have come to our attention.

Firstly, a sourcebook about World War One that concentrates on the global dimension. Great for sources to show diversity and that it was, well, a WORLD War, with global impact.

Secondly, an interesting website of resources about secondary schooling since 1945. A great opportunity to build some oral history around this!

 

Borthwick Institute School Resource Packs

These are nice! The University oof York’s Borthwick Institute has produced these schools packs using material in their extensive archives. There are materials that can be passed on to English and Art colleagues too.

Of most interest to History teachers will be the pack on the Transatlantic Slave Trade, its links to Harewood House and the abolition debate. Local York teachers will find the Heslington Hall materials useful to flavour KS3 topics with local history.

@YorkClio and @Snelsonh had a fascinating day with the Bootham and Retreat Hospital archives – the results of that will be out soon – and you can find the Retreat archives online here too.

meanwhile, elsewhere…

If you haven’t yet found it, here’s a wonderful resource crowd-sourced from history teachers across the country. Richard Kennett (@kenradical) had the great idea to use KS3 homework time to get kids to find out what was going on somewhere else at the same time as the events they were studying in class. A brilliantly simple way to get breadth into a jam-packed curriculum. Will Bailey-Watson (@mrwbw) then suggested a crowd-source of these and has acted as co-ordinator and editor. The results are being posted on the website ‘meanwhile, elsewhere..’ and are free for everyone to use.

 

Resources for Schools from Oxford University

“How do we create a curriculum in schools and universities that best reflects the histories of our current students and future citizens? As Britain has become a more diverse society, and as a result become increasingly aware of its diverse past, the need to ensure that is reflected in what we teach and research is a question of growing importance, educationally and politically.”

That’s the start of the blogpost that explains the thinking behind the new resources for schools trial from Oxford University. You can read the blogpost HERE

The result of this thinking so far is the development of knowledge rich resources that are not focused on the British Isles, or even Europe. This site is worth exploring to expand your own subject knowledge, for resources you can use and adapt for use in class, for ideas about more diverse approaches to school history topics.

The resources team would welcome comments via the website.

Hidden in Plain Sight – resources for teaching the history of people with disability

Following on from our HA conference session in Stratford, here are the copies of the resources. We have a duty to reflect the pasts of all people in society in our classrooms. Our session focused on subject knowledge about the history of disability and ideas for teaching. We worked with a mini-thematic activity exploring disability through time. You can find a Word file of these resources here: Timeline headings and text  Pics for timeline

We suggest that you can first match headings and pictures, then sort the material onto a timeline, then ask questions about continuity and change in attitudes. For example, how complex are attitudes across the medieval period? When was the worst time to be a person with disability in the past? What is the role of factors such as religion, the state, war etc in the story.

This sort of mini-thematic could be used at KS3 (to help students learng to think thematically) or at the start of teaching ‘Medicine Through Time’ (as it explores some very relevant themes to that topic).

The image featured on this blog is a Bruegel called ‘Carnival and Lent’. We ask students to imagine walking through the scene noticing the people. Disability is not hidden away.

We have also developed the idea of ‘slot-ins’. Recognising that the history curriculum is jam-packed, we want to encourage you to recognise the stories that are within the topics you already teach. Slot-ins (not bolt-ons) allow you to introduce richness and diversity to topics from the Tudor court, to slavery abolition, and to civil rights post 1945. You can find these materials here.

Thanks to the team who worked with us yesterday and please do share great ideas for bringing more of these important pasts into our history lessons.

Another useful timeline is here: Disability timeline