Narratives to build chronological understanding and fill in the gaps

Natalie Kesterton, Head of History at Ryedale School and Chartered History Teacher, has developed several approaches to building chronological coherence in the KS3 curriculum by filling the gaps in the story – the bits we don’t have time to teach. She came to the University of York History PGCE mentors’ meeting and shared her ideas so far. This work is being written up for Teaching History and will be featuring in the SHP and HA conferences, so we were lucky to get a preview. Her work supports the development of students’ chronological understanding and helps them to join up the different depth studies by identifying the big themes.  Natalie has kindly shared her resources so far:

final 1660-1750 narrative DIFFERENTIATED X2 

final 1660-1750 narrative DIFFERENTIATED

final 1660-1750 narrative DRAFT THREE

Narrative 1216-1348 DRAFT THREE DIFF needs work

Narrative 1216-1348 DRAFT THREE

Which King 1087-1199 DRAFT THREE DIFFERENTIATED

Which King 1087-1199 DRAFT THREE DIFFERENTIATEDx2

Which King 1087-1199 DRAFT THREE

Diversity resources for busy teachers

Whose Histories?: Helping busy History teachers keep their curriculum diverse

This short guide was created and has been recently updated by the University of York’s PGCE history trainees in a morning session where they thought about diversity and explored what resources are available. It contains some general principles and ideas for making lessons more diverse, with links to resources. It is not intended to be exhaustive, but to be a contribution to help busy teachers. Please do make suggestions to improve it.

whose-histories-diversity-in-history-lessons-2020

History of Women in 6 objects

Does your teaching reflect that over 50% of the people in the past were not male? Here is free resource a history of women through 6 objects to help you.

Inspired by the book ‘A History of Women in 100 Objects’ by Maggie Andrews and Janis Lomas, this classroom wall display has been put together by Ruth Lingard. It takes six objects, explains their past and what they reveal about the women to whom they are connected.

The ‘slot-in’ section is also growing. Check out a new addition on Mary Anning.

Bumping into sources!

Here is a PPT and some thoughts about using sources as evidence at KS3 and KS4 to do well at GCSE and NOT use endless exam questions because: 1) there is more to education, 2) it’s not the way to build secure knowledge for strong results.

Bumping into sources

Accompanying notes

The story of the Pilgrimage of Grace   PoG notes sheet   PoG fact sheet

A taxonomy of substantive knowledge    Brixton burning the riots remembered

What sort of England did William Conquer?

Resources for this enquiry from the HA teachers’ course with the British Library re Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

The lesson plan is here: What sort of England did William conquer lesson plan

The PPT is here: Anglo-Saxons

The sources and chart are here: Sources    Chart for sources  

Teacher crib sheet for source chart

Sources back up Baxter sheet

The interpretations are here:

Baxter balance and faction intBL blogpost intHenry poetry intLacey consent and creativity intLacey life tough intLacey prop USA intMorris church intWood on what is lost intWood rights and property intWood women int

 

YHF Resources: Thomas Becket session

The teaching materials that were presented in November 2018 at Yorkshire History Forum are here for your use. York PGCE medieval religion lessons-FINAL

They are:

  1. An activity about religion in medieval life with plan, resources and subject knowledge for teachers.
  2. Two lessons about Becket, with resources and subject knowledge for teachers.
  3. A fully resourced lesson on the rivalry between York and Canterbury that was fueled by the Becket affair with an impact on the historic environment still evident today.
  4. A lesson on medieval pilgrimage with teacher plan, resources and subject knowledge update.

These materials were developed by the University of York PGCE historians 2017-18. To do this they worked with Jeremy Muldowney from York Minster and with Dr John Jenkins, University of York and other members of the Centre for Christianity and Culture. The materials were edited by Helen Snelson.

 

 

Quality resources about schools and WW1

A couple of really interesting resources that have come to our attention.

Firstly, a sourcebook about World War One that concentrates on the global dimension. Great for sources to show diversity and that it was, well, a WORLD War, with global impact.

Secondly, an interesting website of resources about secondary schooling since 1945. A great opportunity to build some oral history around this!

 

Borthwick Institute School Resource Packs

These are nice! The University oof York’s Borthwick Institute has produced these schools packs using material in their extensive archives. There are materials that can be passed on to English and Art colleagues too.

Of most interest to History teachers will be the pack on the Transatlantic Slave Trade, its links to Harewood House and the abolition debate. Local York teachers will find the Heslington Hall materials useful to flavour KS3 topics with local history.

@YorkClio and @Snelsonh had a fascinating day with the Bootham and Retreat Hospital archives – the results of that will be out soon – and you can find the Retreat archives online here too.

meanwhile, elsewhere…

If you haven’t yet found it, here’s a wonderful resource crowd-sourced from history teachers across the country. Richard Kennett (@kenradical) had the great idea to use KS3 homework time to get kids to find out what was going on somewhere else at the same time as the events they were studying in class. A brilliantly simple way to get breadth into a jam-packed curriculum. Will Bailey-Watson (@mrwbw) then suggested a crowd-source of these and has acted as co-ordinator and editor. The results are being posted on the website ‘meanwhile, elsewhere..’ and are free for everyone to use.